Tag Archives: Breakfast

Flawless Whole Wheat Belgian Waffles

You’re going think I am lying, but I’m not.

I have eaten a Belgian waffle every single day for breakfast since January 29th. (Thanks to a wonderful birthday present from Pace the day before!)

That is over 50 belgian waffles. Seeing as my recipe can only make 5 at a time, that means I have made this recipe about 10 times now. I have perfected it and it is my child. I wanted to create a waffle that was healthy enough to eat on a daily basis, but decadent enough to induce salivation at the mere site or smell.

I am so obsessed with these waffles that I make 5 at a time and freeze them. That way, in the morning, all I have to do is pop one in the toaster oven and in about 5 minutes, I have a perfectly crisp waffle hot and ready for me. If I have 8am class, then I smother half of it in peanut and the half with almond or cashew butter and wrap it up in foil to take with me. And then I  proceed to chow down on it as the students around me give me dirty glares and wistful glances. They see the peanut butter flowing over the delicate walls of the waffle. They can smell the faint hint of vanilla and the earthy goodness of the whole grains. They can see the maniacle pleasure in my eyes as I carefully take each bite, ensuring to ingest only one nut-butter filled crater at at time for maximal waffle enjoyment.

Proof of said madness:

Now that I have thoroughly creeped you out, here is the greatest, most useful recipe I have ever created.

Flawless whole wheat belgian waffles

Recipe: Makes 5 giant waffles

  • 1 1/2 cup white whole wheat flour (option: sub in 1/4 cup wheat bran)
  • 1/2 cup flax meal
  • 1/4 cup sugar or NuNaturals baking blend stevia
  • 1.5 tbsp baking powder
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • 2 cups nonfat milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tbsp coconut oil (do not reduce!)
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Directions – Combine flour, flax, bran if using, sugar, baking powder, and salt in a bowl.

In a separate bowl, mix together the milk, vanilla, and eggs. Pour the wet mix into the dry mix and stir until well combined. Add the coconut oil and mix again. Pour ~1/2 cup batter into a preheated waffle maker and let cook until the steam rate slows and the waffle is browned.

The serving options are endless! So far I have tried…

  • MY GO TO: A couple tablespoons of nut butter; like peanut butter, almond butter, cashew butter, black walnut butter, sunflower seed butter, and vanilla tahini!
  • Greek yogurt mixed with nut butter and/or maple syrup
  • Cream cheese + cinnamon or chopped nuts
  • Coconut butter + maple syrup (pictured below… in class)

I wanted the waffles to have a high fiber content, protein, and be relatively lower carb than normal waffles. The nutrition facts per waffle:

  • Calories – 307
  • Total fat – 12 g
  • Carbs – 38 g
  • Fiber – 9.2 g
  • Sugar – 4.8 g
  • Protein – 13.4 g

Because I have had so many opportunities to play around with this recipe, I have tried versions with peanut flour, protein powder, more bran, less oil, etc. The only alternative version of this recipe that I adore is slightly lower in calories and carbs and higher in protein. It has about 260 calories per waffle and 17 grams of protein. This version is the exact same as the version above, except: 1 cup of white whole wheat flour, 1/2 cup of wheat bran, 1/4 cup of flax meal, 1 scoop (25 grams protein) Total Body Consultants whey protein powder in Cinnamon Bun, 2 tbsp baking powder, and 1 1/2 tbsp coconut oil.

I’ve got to give photo cred to my new friend from CrossFit (!!!!!), Elliot for these mouth watering pictures. It has made me want to invest in a DSLR… perhaps for graduation ;) Mom ;). And, by crazy chance, he and his friends own a website that I have been using for ages! Its an interval workout timer online so that you can do body weight workouts at home without having to mess with stop watches and whatnot. Check it!

Benefits:

Flax * high in B vitamins, magnesium, and f-f-f-fiber! It has more omega 3 fatty acids and antioxidants than any grain!

Wheat bran * contains TONS of iron, B vitamins, magnesium, phosphorous and antioxidants! 1 cup has 25 grams of fiber and 9 grams of protein!

Whole wheat * when you choose white flour over whole wheat flour, you are losing over half of the B vitamins, fiber, folic acid, calcium, zinc, phosphorous, copper, and iron. Whole grains (versus processed) reduce your risk for diabetes and have also been linked to weight loss and maintaining a lower BMI.

Eggs * the yolk is where all the nutrients are! It contains tryptophan, selenium, iodine, B vitamins, and phosphorous, many of which are necessary for optimal metabolism.

Coconut * coconut gets a bad rap because of its saturated fat content, but its fatty acids are mainly medium-chain triglycerides, not long-chain. The long-chain triglycerides are bad for our cholesterol levels, but coconut has been shown to improve cholesterol levels. Animal studies suggest that medium-chain triglycerides can increase metabolism.

Milk * a key source of vitamin D and calcium, as well as protein.

walnut butternut squash soup

I have been craving comforting, savory foods in the morning. This is odd considering I have typically been a fan of syrupy waffles, sweet oatmeal, or sweet yogurt bowls. It may seem strange, but I have been enjoying this creamy, delicate butternut squash soup for breakfast several mornings as of late.

The soup is filling but still light, and provides protein and fiber to keep the belly satisfied. You can also bring it to work or class in tupperware. I recommend the Alladin bowls or Contigo mugs, they keep food hot for up to 3 hours!

Recipe: Makes ~4 large servings

  • 1 butter nut squash
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1/2 cup onions, chopped
  • 3 cups 1 percent milk
  • 1 1/2 chicken broth
  • 1 tsp garlic, minced
  • ¼ tsp pepper
  • ½ tsp salt little under
  • walnuts, to garnish
  • optional: few drops black walnut extract

Directions – Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Roast the squash for 45 minutes to an hour, until soft. While the squash is roasting, melt the butter in a large pan on the stove. Add the onions and cook on medium low heat until caramelized. Towards the end, add the garlic and let lightly brown. When the squash is done, scoop out the seeds. Place in a blender (you may need to do this in two steps) with the milk and broth. Blend until smooth. Pour the squash soup into the pan with the onions and garlic. Add the salt and pepper and optional walnut extract if desired. Alternatively, you can also grind up some walnuts and throw them in the soup. Bring to a light boil and reduce the heat. Cook until thickened to your preference. Serve topped with some chopped walnuts. Enjoy! 

benefits

Butternut squash * a great source of Vitamin C, A, potassium, manganese, and folate. It is also very high in fiber and water content!

Walnuts * a fabulous source of 0mega 3 fatty acids. Walnuts have been found to decrease LDL cholesterol, decrease inflammation, improve endothelial cell function, and decrease risk of excessive blood clotting, all of which decrease heart disease risk. They may also help reduce metabolic syndrome symptoms and decrease tummy fat. They are rich in antioxidants and may help protect against some cancers.

Coming up soon I have a product review that I am actually REALLY excited about: P28 protein bagels and bread!

Have a lovely Tuesday, yall. Remember to stay positive. :)

How anal perfectionists avoid self-destruction:

Ahem, this is week 2 of me sticking to my New Years resolution. Pat on the back right there!

So, I definitely had a meltdown earlier this week. There was self-doubt, worry, anxiety, fear, and salty tears everywhere. Just thinking about everything I needed to cram into my schedule was making me ill, and it was the first day of the quarter! The way I got over it was to first list all the things I needed to make time for in the week:

  • 4 classes at UCD (really just 3 though)
  • 4  2.5 hour MCAT classes per week
  • ~3 hours of MCAT studying per day
  • ~3 study allotments for UCD classes per week
  • an hour to lift weights 3x per week and an hour to exercise in some other way another 2 or 3x per week
  • time to SOCIALIZE or have ME time  e v e r y  s i n g l e  d a y

Next, I drew out the plan. This is mostly accurate, with a few exceptions. And its color coded! Green = class, orange = workout, pink = study, purple = MCAT class.

To get this schedule the way it is, I had to make some sacrifices. Unfortunately, they are very self-serving sacrifices, but, frankly, I don’t care. I will remain sane. I quit my food sampling job to free up 4-8  hours each weekend, and I have at least postponed my internship at the fertility center until I get the hang of everything. I figure I have acquired almost everything I can from it and I can still put it on my application!

Step 3: ACTUALLY FOLLOW THE PLAN. Or at least complete the necessary daily tasks.

I really am sorry to bore you all with that, but maybe it can help some of you find sanity within a crazy schedule. Also, putting it on here holds me more accountable ;)

Now, for the recipe.

See that quiche crust? Looks like brownie, don’t it? But its not! There are no grains, gluten, or nuts (for you, Mark!) in this recipe. The quiche is high protein, high fiber, and filled with veggies! The sweet corn and red bell peppers go well with the cheddar topping and black bean base.

Southwestern Quiche with a grainless, black bean crust

Recipe: Makes 4 large, filling servings

For the crust

  • 1 cup black beans, extremely well drained
  • 1 egg
  • 3 tbsp ground flax

For the filling

  • 3 eggs
  • 5 egg whites
  • 1/2 cup greek yogurt
  • 1/2 bell pepper, diced
  • 1/3 cup onion, diced
  • 1/4 cup salsa
  • 1/2 cup corn
  • “Baja seasoning” or a combo of garlic powder, cayenne pepper, paprika, cumin, salt, pepper, dash onion powder, dash oregano

Topped with 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese or a ‘Mexican blend’

Directions -

First, preheat the oven to 400. Drain the black beans extremely well, press firmly to the point of squishing them a little bit in the can. Combine the beans, egg, and flax in a bowl and mix until homogenous. Grease a quiche dish or baking pan and spread the batter evenly over the bottom. Bake for 10 minutes, until cooked but not yet browned. While the crust is cooking, saute the onions and bell pepper on the stove top with a dash of butter or oil until soft and the onions are lightly browned.

Next, combine all the eggs and yogurt in a bowl and mix well. Fold in the bell pepper, onion, salsa, corn, and spices.

Pour on top of the crust. Reduce the oven heat to 375. Sprinkle the cheese over the top of the quiche. Bake for 35 minutes or until cooked all the way through.

SO EASY.

Benefits:

Onion * Contains quercitin, an antioxidant that halts the growth of tumors! Also, studies have linked regular onion consumption with lower cholesterol and reduced risk of colon cancer. A prime source of chromium.

Eggs * the yolk is where all the nutrients are! It contains tryptophan, selenium, iodine, B vitamins, and phosphorous, many of which are necessary for optimal metabolism. The egg white has 6 grams of complete protein!

Black beans * High in folate, fiber and protein. They also have antioxidants called flavonoids and small amounts of omega 3′s.

Flax * A great source of fiber and omega 3’s!

my current favorite breakfast

Black walnuts remind me of my paternal grandfather. He and the rest of my family lived in a precious house in a small town in Illinois. It was surrounded by corn fields, and like most midwestern homes, had a large basement. In the back corner of the basement was his nut cracking station. It was a wrap-around desk that had a large, stationary nut cracker, hand picks, a radio, a magnifying glass, and boxes and boxes of nuts. The family favorite was and still is black walnuts. They are more abundant and large in the midwest than in California. Here, they are tiny and don’t have much meat, so farmers don’t bother growing them because they don’t want to put in the effort to pick out the little bits of walnut from its hard shell. At the farmers market, I have been harrasing all the nut vendors about black walnuts. They all say the same thing, they aren’t worth it. Finally, one of them surprised me last weekend with a plastic baggy of 8 ounces of black walnuts. It was worth the 8$, easily. English or “Chandler” walnuts can’t hold a candle to the complex and deep flavor of black walnuts. Good luck trying to find them, but I guarantee they are worth the effort.

so filling and satisfying

Maple  bacon and whole grain waffles with cream cheese and black walnuts

Recipe: Serves 1

4 slices turkey bacon (I adore Trader Joes’)

two whole wheat frozen waffles

~3 tbsp full fat, whipped cream cheese

~2 tbsp black walnuts, chopped

maple syrup (I use Josephs sugar free)

Directions – Microwave the turkey bacon for 3.5 minutes, covered with a paper towel. Check it at the end and if you want it to be crispier, blot the grease and cook for an additional 30 seconds. Meanwhile, toast the waffles according to the package’s directions. Smother in cream cheese. Top with black walnuts. Drizzle the waffles and turkey bacon with maple syrup. Enjoy!

Benefits:

Turkey bacon * a great source of B vitamins and lean protein. Make sure you find a brand that has about 30 calories and 6 grams of protein per slice! NOT JENNY O.

Walnuts * a fabulous source of 0mega 3 fatty acids. Walnuts have been found to decrease LDL cholesterol, decrease inflammation, improve endothelial cell function, and decrease risk of excessive blood clotting, all of which decrease heart disease risk. They may also help reduce metabolic syndrome symptoms and decrease tummy fat. They are rich in antioxidants and may help protect against some cancers.

PS:

I went to a “What’s Your Fantasy” party last Thursday. Any guesses as to what my costume is?

PPS:

I went to Foodbuzz Fest this weekend (recap soon) and was convinced by Bobby McCormick that I need a Twitter. I caved. If you want me to follow you, tell me your name! And if you want to hear me say minimal things that are hopefully but doubtfully entertaining, follow me…

WholeWheatrBust

a remedy for the hard days

Health is such a fickle thing. You can feel strong and so good for so long that you start to think that you will never get sick again. That you are just above getting sick. Then, midterms come around, you stay out late a couple times, you work out because you miss it, and BAM – you transform into a walking zombie. My symptoms include…
 an aversion to vegetables
 ice cream dependence
 pain with deep inhalation
 an old man’s weeze
 a sore throat upon waking that only lasts an hour
 constantly tired
 crabby pattys.
My cure?

Chocolate Chip Banana Walnut Bread

this photo does not do the bread justice, I waited until there was only one slice left to photograph it… ;) 

This bread is undeniably delicious and perfect for breakfast, a snack, or even as a warm dessert with a scoop of  vanilla ice cream. It isn’t too sweet to have in the morning, but you can reduce the flour and increase the sugar if you want it to be extremely sweet and dessert-like.

Wet ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 2 ripe bananas
  • 4 tbsp butter
  • 2 tbsp almond butter
  • 3/4 cup sugar or NuNaturals Baking Blend
  • 1 tbsp molasses
Dry ingredients
  • 1  1/4 cups white whole wheat flour
  • 1/2 cups wheat bran (you can just use more flour or ground flax, the purpose is increased fiber)
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/3 – 1/2 cup chocolate chips (depends on your taste, I wanted less)
  • 1/2 – 3/4 cup walnuts (depends on your taste, I wanted tons)
Preheat the oven to 350. Combine all the wet ingredients and mix well. In another bowl, combine all the dry ingredients (except the choco chips and walnuts) and mix well. Pour the wet over the dry and mix well with a spatula. Fold in the walnuts and chocolate chips. Bake for 60 minutes or until the top is lightly browned and it passes the knife test.

Benefits:

Flax * high in B vitamins, magnesium, and f-f-f-fiber! It has more omega 3 fatty acids and antioxidants than any grain!

Whole wheat flour * when you choose white flour over whole wheat flour, you are losing over half of the B vitamins, fiber, folic acid, calcium, zinc, phosphorous, copper, and iron. Whole grains reduce your risk for diabetes and have also been linked to weight loss and maintaining a lower BMI.

Wheat bran * contains TONS of iron, B vitamins, magnesium, phosphorous and antioxidants! 1 cup has 25 grams of fiber and 9 grams of protein!

Bananas * High in potassium which helps the body eliminate excess salt and water (good for bloating)! Also help prevent muscular cramps and improve blood circulation. Bananas are high in zinc, which is key for healthy hair. They have also been linked to the prevention of stomach ulcers because they protect the stomach mucous layer. They are high in vitamins C and A, and phosphorus (which helps improve memory).

Cinnamon * High in antioxidants. Also aids in controlling blood sugar levels. Why does blood sugar matter? Spikes in blood sugar are bad for your health because they cause your body to increase insulin production. Insulin, among many other things, tells your body to store fat. Therefore, eating a sugary/high-in-simple-carbohydrate meal = blood sugar spike = insulin spike = store fat. Even worse, years of insulin spikes can lead to insulin resistance, which can then lead to diabetes.

Walnuts * contain the healthy monounsaturated fats!

How to make your own Trader Joes pumpkin cream cheese!

With the first day of October, Davis transformed from Summer to Fall. While this makes me sad for many reasons, mainly pants, there is one particular redeeming quality to the winter months….

Pumpkin.

Pumpkin pie oatmeal, pumpkin ice cream, homemade pumpkin lattes, pumpkin yogurt, pumpkin pecan muffins, pumpkin scones, pumpkin cinnamon rolls, pumpkin & goat cheese biscuits, pumpkin protein smoothies, pumpkin pasta……(the word pumpkin now looks really weird & wrong) will all be consumed on the reg until I can live in shorty shorts again.

This mornings breakfast was a chicken apple breakfast sausage and two whole wheat mini bagels smothered in homemade pumpkin cream cheese. Amazing.

Pumpkin Cream Cheese

Recipe: Makes 1 serving (maybe two if you don’t drown the bagels)

1/4 cup cream cheese (I am usually all about the full fat, but in this case I used Trader Joe’s whipped light cream cheese – it was easier to mix!)

2 tbsp canned pumpkin

1 tsp maple syrup (I used Josephs sugar free)

1/2 tsp brown sugar

1/8 tsp  pumpkin pie spice

pinch salt

optional: 2-3 drops NuNaturals vanilla stevia (you could sub in a drop of vanilla extract and a bit more sugar or maple syrup if desired)

Directions – Combine all the ingredients and stir vigorously with a  fork. Spread on toasted whole grain bagels or use as a frosting for cupcakes or cookies!

PS

I made caramelized sweet potato ice cream with toasted marshmallow swirl. I will share the recipe soon. Be ready.

Light and quick… whole grain pumpkin cinnamon rolls

Twice now I have asked readers to divulge what recipes they would like me to post. While I have fulfilled many of the requests, there has been one that has been haunting me. More than any other baked good, dessert, entree, drink, or snack, you people have been wanting… cinnamon rolls.

you would never, ever in a billion years think these were healthy

At first, I didn’t know what to do with that request. How can I make a juicy, sugar-laden cinnamon roll fit into my healthy living blog?

Well. Apparently, one can make a cinnamon roll whole grain, sneak in some flax, shove in some veggies, decrease the sugar and butter (although there ain’t nothin wrong with butter), and still have it taste a m a z i n g . Furthermore, to indulge in my laziness, I used zero yeast and didn’t have to wait around for the dough to rise. Or whatever?

These were so good that I brought a couple over to my neighbors (who were born during the Mesolithic era) as an apology for Nina barking at night a couple weeks ago.

So good that my room mates swarmed them as soon as they came out of the oven.

So good that I shamelessly sequestered two from the pan and am hoarding them in my freezer for… later…

Whole grain pumpkin cinnamon rolls

very low sugar and fat and all whole grain!

Recipe: Makes ~16 cinnamon rolls

Dough

  • 1  + 3/4 cups white whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 cup ground flax
  • 2 tablespoons NuNaturals stevia baking blend (or sugar)
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1/4 cup canned pumpkin
  • 3/4 cup milk (mine had gone bad so I used 1/4 cup half and half and 1/2 cup almond milk)

Filling

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tbsp canned pumpkin
  • 1/2 cup NuNaturals baking blend stevia (or sugar)
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar (or more baking blend)
  • 1/4 tsp molasses
  • 1 tbsp cinnamon
  • dash salt
Directions – 
For the filling, combine all of the ingredients in a bowl and mix to form a pasty mixture. Using your hands is helpful. Set aside.
For the dough, combine all of the ingredients except the milk  in a large bowl and mix well. Add the milk and mix until a soft dough forms.
Lay down a sheet of wax paper and cover with a decent layer of flour. Scoop half of the dough onto the paper and roll out so that it is about 1/4 inch thick and in the shape of a piece of paper. Spread half of the filling over the dough. For mini buns, roll the dough hot dog style. For full sized cinnamon rolls, roll it the other direction (so that the roll is thicker, not longer). Slice the roll as thick as you want the cinnamon rolls to be. 
Repeat with the other half of the dough. Bake at 400 for 15 minutes. ENJOY!!!!!!!

Benefits:

Flax seeds * are loaded with omega 3′s (specifically alpha linolenic acid) which can reduce inflammation! Omega 3s are also used to prevent blood clots and increase cell plasticity (which can help diabetics). Daily flax consumption can lower cholesterol levels and also provides a healthy dose of fiber in every tablespoon!

Whole wheat flour * The outer bran layer in whole grains is where the fiber, vitamins, and minerals are, which is why you should ditch the white.

Pumpkin * An impressive source of vitamins A and C and iron, manganese, and riboflavin! Also is high in fiber ;)

Cinnamon * The coolest thing about cinnamon is its ability to control blood sugar. Meaning, within reason, that if you use a fair amount of cinnamon in a dish that has sugar or another fast digesting carbohydrate, it will help prevent the blood glucose spike that you would normally get. Why does blood sugar matter? Spikes in blood sugar are bad for your health because they cause your body to increase insulin production. Insulin, among many other things, tells your body to store fat. Therefore, eating a sugary/high-in-simple-carbohydrate meal = blood sugar spike = insulin spike = store fat.

perfect.